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  4.  | How to minimize the risk of a dog attack

How to minimize the risk of a dog attack

On Behalf of | Jul 20, 2022 | Dog bite injuries

When properly trained and socialized, dogs tend to enjoy interacting with humans. However, this doesn’t mean that they can’t become aggressive with little or no warning. Fortunately, knowing how to read a canine’s body language can help minimize the risk that you or your Texas children are the victims of a dog attack.

What are some signs that a dog is agitated or angry?

If you see a dog’s fur standing up, it is a sure sign that it is feeling threatened. Other signs of canine agitation include aggressive tail wagging, enlarged pupils and the showing of teeth. In many cases, an angry dog will growl at the person or animal it perceives to be a threat. Moving away from a dog that is providing such cues may prevent an attack that could result in serious dog bite injuries.

What might make a dog angry?

In some cases, simply standing between a dog and its toys, food or favorite people is enough to upset it. When dogs are in groups, they may succumb to a herd mentality that turns even generally docile canines into aggressive beasts. Pulling on a dog’s tail, ears or other parts of its body will typically result in an animal that is more likely to nip, bite or attack you. Finally, a dog may react aggressively if you intrude on its territory, throw objects at it or otherwise threaten its security.

If you’re bitten by a dog, you may be entitled to compensation for medical bills and other damages. Texas adheres to the one-bite rule, which means that an owner may escape some liability if there wasn’t reason to believe that the animal was vicious. However, an owner is still liable for following leash and other laws while a dog is in public.

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